On Friday, the Olympic Games have finally kicked off with a great ceremony. Being Canadian, I readily admit to being biased but I thought it was a colourful, original, energizing, contemporary production.

However, have you noticed that the most vociferous sports critics and self-proclaimed “experts” are also the ultimate coach potatoes who are way more qualified to be experts in soft drinks, beer and packaged snacks than in competitive sports?

Likewise, all of a sudden, you can read pretty awful “analyses” of the event by numerous bloggers and bloggettes who, in most cases, wouldn’t be able to organize a two-person picnic, leave alone an opening ceremony of these proportions.

There is nothing new about this. I have written scores of articles and spoke in front of professional audiences. People who understand the subject offer their own poignant examples and point out critical issues. The unrecognized geniuses of the cubicle jungle tell me that I got it completely wrong, or that there is a typo or that I’ve “obviously an academic” (which I have never been, an easy thing to verify).

We cannot stop doing what we do, working to improve ourselves and others every day just because someone of no consequence wants to hear his or her voice. We cannot go through life paying too much attention to unsolicited, self-serving criticism. It is just not worth it.

I will listen to Jamie Sale’s commentary on ice skating, not to that of my 45 year old neighbour who lives in his parents’ basement.

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