When start sharing your intellectual property, your ideas and your take on matters, as I do through my writing, speaking and teaching, you are bound to face something which you have never experienced before.

You will find that there are people who will:

  • steal your stuff
  • call it inferior because it’s trite
  • call it inferior because it’s overcomplicated
  • say hurtful things for no reason
  • accuse you of anything you can imagine
  • need serious mental health help, and the sooner, the better.

Recently, a consultant posted my article on a change management group on LinkedIn for discussion. A bunch of cubicle dwellers descend on it. The first guy to comment calls it “simplistic, even trite.” An academic who “is trying to publish an article” “somewhat agrees”.

I joined after perhaps 40 comments and pointed out the context and the media for which the piece was written and invite the group to discuss the work of Argyris, Maslow, McGregor and others. Nothing happens there except the academic trying to explain what he meant and the first guy – class act! – deleting his “trite” comment.  This is the kind of attention one has to deal with.

Another example is the recent video produced based on my article. A small group of low level IT people from the ilk of unrecognized geniuses (do you know the type?) offer, in incomprehensible English their opinions, roughly equal in their depth to “this is all crap.” Impossible to reason with or engage into discussion, I tried but could not allow myself to stoop to their level, so, gave up.

Doing this kind of work is impossible without a healthy dose of self-esteem and a belief that your work and ideas are immensely valuable. I would be much more discouraged by the deafening silence than by a few hecklers. This is a part of the game. If you are looking to start projecting your ideas, be prepared to the fact that not everyone out there will love you.

It just comes from the territory.

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